The Giants Anniversary Cap

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This hat was actually a Christmas gift by my friend Matt; just want to take a moment to say thanks buddy, since this article would not be possible without you. I have always had a soft spot for the San Francisco Giants. The only reason I can think of that would make sense as to why is when my uncle passed away, my aunt gave me this:
NY Giants Santa

It’s a statue of a New York Giants Santa Claus that used to belong to him, and it’s something that I personally value very deeply. Is it the world’s best reason? No, but its the only one I have. Despite beating the Phillies during the 2010 NLCS, I had held on to no ill will; two straight World Series appearances was hard enough, and not making a third was completely understandable. However, a trade made just before the 2012 deadline however, gave me an entirely new reason: Hunter Pence.

Hunter Pence

On July 29, 2011, Houston Astros’ All-Star Outfielder Hunter Pence was traded to the Phillies for a group of 4 prospects: Jonathan Singleton, Jarred Cosart, Josh Zeid and Domingo Santana. Overnight he became a beloved figure in Philadelphia. He was seen as a hero and the last piece in the puzzle for the Phillies to make it back to the World Series. He filled the gapping hole left by the departure of Jayson Werth to the Washington Nationals during the offseason. 2011 was a monster season for Pence: fourth in the NL in batting average (.314) and eighth in RBIs with 97. In their eyes, they finally found their next young outfielder, who was only 28 at the time.

Almost the instant he set down in the city, he became a hero. Shirts labeled “Pence-sylvania” were common place. Billboards of his face could be seen far and wide. His jersey was the ninth best selling in all of the MLB. His bobble head night for 2012 sold out instantly, and word of his entirely paleolithic diet became consistent topic of convorsation. TV’s across the area ran add’s featuring Pence and his trade-markedly high socks.

Tragically, the good times were not meant to last. Less than a year after being traded to the Phillies, falling short of their World Series expectations, they sent Pence packing to Cali to join the eventual World Champion Giants for OF Nate Schierholtz, RP Seth Rosin and catching prospect Tommy Joseph. The Phillies were on the borderline of contention, eventually finishing with a .500 record, something that they felt didn’t require an All-Star outfielder in his prime. But just because Pence left Philadelphia, it doesn’t mean that Philadelphia was ready to let him go. They still went ahead with his bobble head night as planned, which included a “personal” note from Hunter himself.

Thanks, Phillies fans, for the great memories. I’m glad my Bobble Figurine will still be given out even though I’m no longer in Philadelphia. I hope it will serve as a lasting reminder of my time there. It was a year of my career that I will never forget.

That year during the World Series, several Giants credited Pence’s presence on the field and as a leader in the clubhouse to their title as Champions. I was there for his first game back in Philadelphia, where he was met with thunderous applause every time he look the plate, tipping his cap to the fans and the city. He was the hard working, classy fan favorite what Philadelphia will forever embrace. No matter where his career will take him*, the love of Philadelphia and their fans will always follow.

*As long as that place isn’t New York, Washington or Atlanta.

The Hillsboro Hops Cap

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Whenever a new team enters any league, goes through a total re-branding, or moves it is almost a certainty that I will get that cap. The Hillsboro Hops are no exception, moving from Yakima, Washington to Hillsboro Oregon in time for the 2013 season. A Short-Season A affiliate of the Arizona Diamondbacks, the Hops are the only professional baseball team in the Portland metropolitan area, and try to reflect the community they represent. They are so named after the Hops which are commonly used in the beer-making process, which Oregon is known for. According to my friend who used to live in the state, about 1/3 of all beer produced in the United States can be traced back to Oregon. Even their mascot Barley’s name was chosen from a contest in the local community.

As far as non-baseball awards go, the Hops won just about every one they could. The Hops’ branding and logo was named the best in all of Minor League Baseball for 2013 by Ballpark Digest; that is out of 243 possible teams. The odds of wining that award are .413223%. Even their beloved mascot Barley was named the winner of the Northwest League “Mascot Mania” contest. They played their first ever home game in front of a sold out crowd of 4710 at Hillsboro Ballpark, and the fans continued to come. They even lead their league in attendance, giving the Portland area a team of their own.

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Barley, the official mascot of the Hillsboro Hops

Since 2013 was their inaugural season as the Hops, no one of note has passed through the system as of yet, but that doesn’t mean the franchise hasn’t had its fair share of notable alumni in the pre-Hillsboro era. Back when they were a Los Angeles Dodgers affiliate, many future All-Stars played for the then named Yakima Bears, including Paul Konerko, Shane Victorino and Carlos González, who have all had outstanding careers at the major league level.

Time will tell whether any current Hops players will reach any success at the Major League level, but former Hops closer Daniel Gibson is currently ranked 20th on the Diamonabacks Top 20 Prospect List, with an ETA to the Majors put at 2015. One of four Hops players to be named to the Northwest League All-Star Game, Gibson posted a 0.56 ERA through 16 innings of work. I, along with many Hops fans, hope to see this guy make it to the big leagues, giving them the first MLB player they can call their own alumni.

Sadly, their inaugural season was filled with mediocrity on the field. Their team batting average was .238, while they hit only 29 home runs in 78 games. The nature of Short-Season A means that most if not all players will be new to the team, allowing for a potentially quick turnaround for the infant franchise. I wear this cap proudly, supporting a franchise that is filled with potential and has the community willing to embrace it.